Home » Author Archives: Marianna Meloni

Author Archives: Marianna Meloni

Never Swim Alone, Etcetera Theatre – Review

NSA Press Image

Pros: The fresh take on the pressures entailed by an alpha male role. Cons: The narrative structure feels fragmentary. Bill (Azan Ahmed) and Frank (Jack Dillon) have been friends since childhood and know each other’s secrets and history. They both look smart and act cool, wearing blue suits and fancy silk ties. Looking impeccable, pleasing the boss and being cordial to each other are all part of their role, although, deep inside, they’re burning with mutual envy and tormented by an unreasonable pressure ...

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To The Bone, Katzspace Studio – Review

Poster Motherhood or Madness & Specky Ginger C_nt

Pros: The bleak honesty of Motherhood or Madness and Eoin McKenna’s top-notch comedic delivery in Specky Ginger C*nt. Cons: Motherhood or Madness could benefit from a more imaginative lighting design, whereas Specky Ginger C*nt plunges too deeply into hopeless drama. In a renewed climate of female emancipation, women are unafraid to address motherhood in dispassionate tones. No longer seen as a gift from god, nor a state of bliss, it is often considered a mere inconvenience, a life-changing event over ...

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Drowned or Saved?, Tristan Bates Theatre – Review

Drowned Or Saved - Marco Gambino & Paula Cassina - Photo by Ewa Ferdynus

Pros: The poignant portrayal of Primo Levi is brought to life by an excellent cast. Cons: Condensed into just over one hour, the events described might feel fragmentary. Primo Levi’s contributions play a pivotal role in our understanding of the Holocaust. Born and bred in the Italian city of Turin, he was deported to Auschwitz in 1944 and owes his survival to the Nazis’ decision to employ him as a chemist in a rubber factory – which kept him away ...

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Lifeboat, Jack Studio Theatre – Review

Lifeboat at Jack Studio Theatre

Pros: The dramaturgy, the design, the acting. Cons: I should stop going to see plays that make me emotional. In July 1940, the imminent German invasion and the continuous bombings of most British cities convinced the Government of the necessity to exile as many children as possible to other Commonwealth countries. For this purpose, the Children’s Overseas Reception Board was established, which saw the registration of over 200,000 youths in the first few months of its existence. Amongst them, 15 ...

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Fabric, Soho Theatre – Review

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Pros: The universality of the scenario portrayed. Cons: The lack of insight and character development. Sexism is ingrained in the very fabric of society and I can’t think of a single woman who hasn’t experienced it throughout life. In the case of Leah (played by the mesmerising Nancy Sullivan) this disparity is taken to the extreme, with life-changing events in which men always have the upper hand. Working in a bespoke tailoring boutique in Savile Row, thirty-year old Leah is ...

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Unfolded, The Bread and Roses Theatre – Review

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Pro’s: The event constitutes a valid and accessible platform to discuss socio-political issues. Con’s: A bit of background information about some of the stories would have been useful. With the intention of exploring how global events have an impact on every-day life, Some People Productions put a call out a few months ago, looking for young political writers with a story to tell. The outcome is the second edition of their sell-out ‘quick-writing response magazine-theatre night’, where six 15-minute long ...

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Distance, Park Theatre – Review

Distance Production Photos

©The Other Richard

Pros: The solid sound and lighting design. Cons: This pessimistic portrayal of mental illness doesn’t contribute to fighting the stigma, and risks sending out a discouraging message. The soaring incidence of suicide in British men under 45 has recently become one of the most recurrent topics in fringe theatre. This reflects an attempt to make sense of the phenomenon, raise awareness and, in many cases, try to suggest solutions. Playwright Alex McSweeney’s decision to explore this subject matter came after ...

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