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Author Archives: Marianna Meloni

STYX, Zoo Southside (Main House) – Review

The brain is a wonderful machine. Able to store incredible amounts of information and produce a huge range of feelings and emotions. But what happens when it stops working properly? How can we salvage those precious moments, the knowledge and memories built over a lifetime? Led by Max Barton, the seven-strong band Second Body addresses this matter in an emotional musical journey. Interspersed with poetry, verbatim and a live score, it tells the story of how Max’s grandparents met and ...

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Gun, Assembly Rooms (Front Room) – Review

A man and his guns are wandering the Wild West. His name, Roscoe ‘Blackjack’ Porter. And he’s bleeding. He owes his life to his loyal weapons, Bess and Bella, and his inseparable deck of cards. Those, together with a good bottle of whiskey, are all the family he has left. He’s got a long walk ahead, so he takes the opportunity to recall the events that led him to this state with flashbacks of his last few days. It all ...

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Blood and Gold, Scottish Storytelling Centre – Review

A young woman is entrusted by her dying mother with a wooden box containing all the stories and words she knows. But not prepared to listen to them again, the bereaved daughter hides the box under her bed, wanting to forget about it. As the years go past, she grows lonely and misunderstood, gradually giving in to the Shadow Man – a sly creature who lingers around her and whispers demeaning messages into her ear. An impending sense of unworthiness ...

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Better Than Sex: The Story of Mae West, Toulouse Lautrec – Review

Emily Hutt’s tell-all cabaret on the 1930’s limelight icon Mae West follows almost pedantically the chronology of her life events, to the detriment of a sought-after dramatic climax. West – embodied by the talented Bella Bevan – takes centre stage with the accompaniment of pianist Kieran Stallard, and alternates tales from her past with some of her most recognisable songs. A promising opening scene involves some of the biting one-liners that made the artist famous, smattered with sexual innuendos and ...

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