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Monthly Archives: January 2019

Bricks of The Wall, Etcetera Theatre – Review

Pros: Has little to commend it, aside from a cast who are clearly enjoying the material.      Cons: Suffers from an overdone plot, clunky dialogue, poor characterization and, most regrettably, nothing to say. Brexit was, for better or worse, a defining moment in British history. Depending on your outlook, the vote to leave the European Union could represent triumph or travesty, a chance to redefine British society and identity or a woeful regression to a darker time in European politics. Theatre can, ...

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Gentleman Jack, Jack Studio Theatre – Review

Pros: Tremendous acting, wonderful writing, and a fantastic look into the past of an incredible woman. Cons: There are some slight questions around the character development. If you ever needed a reason to venture into South East London, Gentleman Jack at the Brockley Jack theatre is it. This true story of a remarkable female pioneer is inspiring, absorbing, and deserves a full house at every performance. The story of Anne Lister is set across three different decades in the 1800s, ...

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Totem, Royal Albert Hall – Review

Pros: The set. The sound design. The projection. The lighting. Cons: Far too many people in the audience filming the show on their phones. A silvery particle spins and tumbles from above, setting in train an evolutionary journey from primordial soup to space exploration. Well that’s the idea, anyway. More prosaically, Totem is a high-spec review show, in which circus acts, loosely themed around ideas of man’s evolution and environment, are interspersed with quirky comic vignettes. The circus acts are ...

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Theatre Access Schemes – Part 2

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Part One of our Theatre Access Series looked at what exactly Access Schemes are and what it can mean to be an Access Customer. In Part Two, Sidonie shares her experience as an Access Customer while attending a recent performance. As with Part One, we hope this gives more insight and understanding as to why it’s important Access Schemes exist. Experience as an Access Customer So, what’s different for an Access Customer when they attend a performance? In many ways nothing, in ...

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Illicit Signals: Bletchley, COLAB Factory – Review

Pros: The unique format, which combines gaming and immersive theatre, gives everyone a chance to get stuck in and kick some Nazi arse. Cons: This is not the kind of immersive theatre where you can just hang back and tag along, so if you’re not up for getting actively involved, this one’s not for you. During the Second World War, Bletchley Park was the home of the UK code breakers, the most famous of whom was computer pioneer Alan Turing. ...

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Original Death Rabbit, Jermyn Street Theatre – Review

Pros: The beguiling Kimberly Nixon mastering some tightly packed dialogue. Cons: The script is occasionally patronising, diminishing what is otherwise a smartly observed piece. I always feel a quiet burst of pride when among the first to see a new play. So I can now say I was there for the Original Death Rabbit at the Jermyn Street Theatre. Rose Heiney (of Fresh Meat fame) adapted her original Radio 4 play for the stage and has produced a dark and ...

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The War of the Worlds, New Diorama Theatre – Review

Pros: The seamless combination of action, lighting and sound. Cons: Nothing much springs to mind. Don’t go to this show expecting a complete run through of the HG Wells book. Instead, using the 1938 Orson Welles radio broadcast as a starting point, Rhum and Clay have explored people’s propensity to readily accept that all they hear and read is true with, in this case, some unintended consequences for one family.Starting off with a re-creation of the radio play the focus ...

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An Enemy of the People, Union Theatre – Review

Pros: A couple of strong performances Cons: Wavering American accents, stodgy direction, humourless script In 1882 Henrik Ibsen, reeling from the public outcry over the sexual frankness in Ghosts, wrote An Enemy of the People about one man daring to speak the truth at any cost. In 1950 it was adapted by Arthur Miller, keeping strictly to the same plot and scene structure but removing some of the more unpalatable references to eugenics – and it’s Miller’s version that appears ...

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Holler Box