Home » Reviews » Off West End

Off West End

Ah, the Off West End. For those not familiar with the term, this is where the real magic of the London theatre scene happens. Great shows are born here, in pubs, in 50-seat theatres, in tunnels. Recommended for the adventurous – we can’t get enough of it, and you’ll save a quid or two as well!

Fabric, Soho Theatre – Review

EverythingTheatre_Default (1)

Pros: The universality of the scenario portrayed. Cons: The lack of insight and character development. Sexism is ingrained in the very fabric of society and I can’t think of a single woman who hasn’t experienced it throughout life. In the case of Leah (played by the mesmerising Nancy Sullivan) this disparity is taken to the extreme, with life-changing events in which men always have the upper hand. Working in a bespoke tailoring boutique in Savile Row, thirty-year old Leah is ...

Read More »

Midnight, Union Theatre – Review

Midnight-square

Pros: Catchy tunes, zingy one-liners and great performances. A hugely enjoyable riot. Cons: The play takes a little time to warm up, but the wait is worth it. When the devil sings, he roars, he reigns. New Year’s Eve, at the height of Stalin’s Great Purge. A young couple try to create a moment of solace in their little flat. A mysterious visitor brutally invites himself into their home. Time stops, and an air of wonderful menace hangs over the stage. Adapted from Elchin’s ...

Read More »

Blood Wedding, Omnibus Theatre – Review

Racheal Ofori and Ash Rizi (Bride and Leo) web pic credit Nick Arthur Daniel

Pro’s: Intensely dramatic and beautiful adaptation of classic; not one to miss. Con’s: Anything that wasn’t quite up-to-scratch was forgiveable, and more than made up for. Lorca’s classic is given the modern-day London treatment by a multinational, multi-talented cast. Boldly and subtly adapted into the 21st Century, this production of Blood Wedding seamlessly weaves the everyday of 2018 into the grand and timeless themes presented first in Madrid 85 years ago. This adaptation of what is, at its simplest, a ...

Read More »

Distance, Park Theatre – Review

Distance Production Photos

©The Other Richard

Pros: The solid sound and lighting design. Cons: This pessimistic portrayal of mental illness doesn’t contribute to fighting the stigma, and risks sending out a discouraging message. The soaring incidence of suicide in British men under 45 has recently become one of the most recurrent topics in fringe theatre. This reflects an attempt to make sense of the phenomenon, raise awareness and, in many cases, try to suggest solutions. Playwright Alex McSweeney’s decision to explore this subject matter came after ...

Read More »

Italian Theatre Festival, Print Room at The Coronet – Review

marcello-magni

Pros: A rare opportunity to see some of Italy’s most iconic theatre works. Cons: The language barrier is only partially compensated by the presence of subtitles. Promoted by the Italian Cultural Institute and curated by Monica Capuani, the first edition of the Italian Theatre Festival was hosted at The Coronet, a long-standing arts institution in the heart of Notting Hill. Spread over two days, the event included four plays by some of Italy’s most renowned theatre-makers, as well as a ...

Read More »

Kiss Me, The Other Palace – Review

image2

Pros: Great jokes and a wonderful heroine Cons: The bits of slo-mo physical theatre don’t add much The narrative holds few surprises, but Kiss Me is a beautiful chamber piece that draws you in with the warmth and complexity of its two characters, Stephanie and Dennis. Stephanie was a young bride and now, in the aftermath of World War I, is a young widow. With most of the young men gone, she enjoys doing a man’s work, driving a truck, ...

Read More »