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Tag Archives: Omnibus Theatre

Blood Wedding, Omnibus Theatre – Review

Racheal Ofori and Ash Rizi (Bride and Leo) web pic credit Nick Arthur Daniel

Pro’s: Intensely dramatic and beautiful adaptation of classic; not one to miss. Con’s: Anything that wasn’t quite up-to-scratch was forgiveable, and more than made up for. Lorca’s classic is given the modern-day London treatment by a multinational, multi-talented cast. Boldly and subtly adapted into the 21st Century, this production of Blood Wedding seamlessly weaves the everyday of 2018 into the grand and timeless themes presented first in Madrid 85 years ago. This adaptation of what is, at its simplest, a ...

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The Soul of Wittgenstein, Omnibus Theatre – Review

wittgenstein-23-Ben Woodhall - Press

Pros: Subtlety, hilarity and tragedy in equal measure Cons: Restatement of character qualities becomes repetitive in just a few places, but that’s it Based on a tidbit of information that philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein spent a period pushing trolleys at Guy’s Hospital during the Second World War, writer Ron Elisha weaves a rich narrative that, in just over an hour, explores philosophy, language, literature, religion, and an intriguing relationship between an Austrian ex-professor and an illiterate Cockney amputee. The performance took at Omnibus Theatre, and the ...

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Drag me to love, Omnibus Theatre, Clapham – Review

Credit: Chris Bishop

Pros: A glittery, toe-tapping fun fest which gives you an insight behind the scenes of the world of drag. Cons: We were promised a few tears, but I didn’t shed any. Would have liked to see a little bit more of the struggle in Bonnie’s story. A riot of iconic gay anthems, neon wigs and fistfuls of glitter confetti, this 45-minute performance is the story of Cameron Sharp’s early life and that of his drag alter ego, Bonnie Love. We ...

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A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Omnibus Theatre – Review

IMG_5423 (1)

Pros: Imaginative, energetic and really entertaining. Cons: The performance is quite long and requires some serious stamina. The other night I had a funny dream. Accompanied by three other people, I was exploring the streets of Clapham Old Town, visiting estate agents, entering empty Italian cafes and interacting with some odd individuals. I had headed to Clapham Common to attend a performance of William Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream but, instead of the theatre’s address, I was told to wait ...

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