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Reviews

Reviewing is at the heart of what we do. Here you’ll find all the reviews that our wonderful team have written. If you want to find something more specific, why not pick a genre of show instead from the list in the menu

ear for eye, Royal Court Theatre – Review

Pros: Excellent performances from all concerned. Cons: The fragmented style of the dialogue.  Ominous music pervades the auditorium as you enter, and the stage is filled by an opaque screen which resembles a giant TV. Shadowy figures walk up to the screen and look out at the audience before disappearing into the murky background. The piece is just over two hours, without interval, consisting of three distinct parts. Part one is a series of vignettes where most of the 16 strong ...

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Fans, Canada Water Theatre – Review

Pros: Theatre and live music gig for the price of one! Cons: The show is on tour with only short stops, so you’ll have to be quick off the mark to see it! Nina Berry’s show Fans is described as a performance for anyone who has ever loved music – i.e., everyone. Indeed, it is hard to think of anyone who wouldn’t be charmed by the humour, energy and sheer joyfulness of Fans. It’s a beautiful production peppered with excellent musical hits, ...

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Honour, Park Theatre – Review

Pros: Outstanding performances bring passion to an effervescent script. Cons: Written 15 years ago, some of the sexual mores can seem outdated. An older man leaves his wife for a younger woman. It’s a story we’ve seen dozens of times before – but in Australian playwright Joanna Murray-Smith’s hands this age-old tale becomes something entirely new, through well-rounded characters and thought-provoking dialogue. George, in a compelling performance by Henry Goodman, is a celebrity intellectual, who dispenses his wisdom through TV ...

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Shrödinger’s Dog, White Bear Theatre – Review

Pros: This is a full-throttle production by a contemporary theatre company oozing with confidence. Cons: The action is distractingly far-fetched, to the point of total implausibility, while the characters are never developed much beyond surface-level. It’s also about 45 minutes too long. Shrödinger’s Dog, the second production from young theatre company Break the Verse, is presented as “a black comedy about the epidemic of male suicide with an LGBTQ+ twist”. It also features a cast of nine, and touches on ...

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Buddha Babies, The Soho Theatre – Review

Evenings with the Crick Crack Club begin with a call and response: the word ‘CRICK’ prompts the audience to inform their storyteller that they are open to listening, and therefore you are required to reply emphatically ‘CRACK’. Thus begins a slightly barmy, but beautiful evening of storytelling. Buddha Babies, with story teller Xanthe Gresham Knight, is a complex and hilarious exploration of what it means to be ‘childless’, with whatever connotations that might carry for a woman, negative or positive. In the ...

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Medusa, Sadlers Wells – Review

Pros: The thought that went into the movement, the production, set, music, costume. Brilliantly executed, bringing serious topics to the forefront to force us as a society to address them. Cons: Although the movement was amazing to watch, at points it repeated the ‘puppetry’ physicality a bit too much. Jasmin Vardimon and her company’s work are all about making the body political. Justicia comments on the injustice in our legal system. 7734 was representative of Vardimon’s own experience as a ...

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The Wipers Times, The Arts Theatre – Review

Pros: A wonderfully evocative script that allows an excellent cast to explore the humour, pathos and downright brutality of war. Cons: Some time might have been shaved off the 2 hours 10 minute duration for a more streamlined production. Sunday 11 November 2018 marks a significant centenary in the annuls of human conflict. One hundred years have now passed since the Armistice was signed formally ending World War I. The Great War was one of the bloodiest, claiming 17 million ...

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The Wild Duck at Almeida Theatre – Review

Pros: The Wild Duck is a witty and inventive adaptation of Ibsen’s masterpiece. Cons: The play lacks in subtext and can sometimes feel more intellectual than emotional. Henrik Ibsen wrote The Wild Duck in 1884. He was white, Norwegian, and fifty-six. He had fathered an illegitimate child. His father was declared bankrupt. This is the truth, we are told, but from the very moment this word is uttered, at the beginning of the play, we are invited to question everything. What ...

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