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Off West End

Ah, the Off West End. For those not familiar with the term, this is where the real magic of the London theatre scene happens. Great shows are born here, in pubs, in 50-seat theatres, in tunnels. Recommended for the adventurous – we can’t get enough of it, and you’ll save a quid or two as well!

Becoming Mohammed, Pleasance Theatre – Review

Credit: London Theatre 1

Pros: Good intentions, and some strong performances. Cons: Misses its opportunity to harness an interesting subject. The courage of And Many Others’ Becoming Mohammed at the Pleasance Theatre is apparent from its title. Discussion of integration among Muslim communities, the place of Islam in the West and the experiences of Muslims today, is at once omnipresent and absent – a subject frequently mentioned, but seldom brought to life on stage. Becoming Mohammed not only takes an unblinking look at these complexities, but also does ...

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The Ferryman, Royal Court Theatre – Review

Credit: The Upcoming

Pros: First-rate writing and direction, a stellar cast, thoughtful staging and a heartbreaking story. Cons: It is quite long (three hours). It’s Armagh, 1981, and the Carney family, abundant with elders, children, and a goose, are preparing for the annual harvest in a time rife with uncertainty. Seamus Carney’s body is found in a bog, with a bullet in his head, which leads his family down a slippery slope, whether they are aware of it or not, to a potential ...

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All Our Children, Jermyn Street Theatre – Review

All_Our_Children_2743a

Pros: An engaging and meticulously researched script, combined with superb performances, make for a genuinely harrowing story. Cons: Needless sound effects and some unwieldy dialogue diminish the overall power of the piece. To my shame, this was my first visit to the Jermyn Street Theatre. On the strength of this visit, it won’t be my last; the theatre is welcoming, comfortable and damned accessible by public transport. Interestingly, to get to the theatre’s toilets you actually have to go across the stage and through ...

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This Beautiful Future, The Yard Theatre – Review

Credit: Richard Lakos

Pros: An interesting view on love and war Cons: Some questionable karaoke that might not be to everyone’s taste It is 1944 in occupied France. Two teenagers exchange laughter and kisses and find love in spite of war. The story follows Elodie (Hannah Millward) and Otto (Bradley Hall) an unlikely but electric pairing; Elodie is a whimsical and playful French girl, while Otto is a German solider regimented, and brainwashed by Hilter’s rhetoric. The two find comfort and joy in each other’s company while ...

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