Home » Reviews » Drama (page 10)

Drama

A staple for us and for many if you fancy a more traditional play. When we first started Everything Theatre it was specifically to review drama. We’ve branched out over the years, but it will always be a favourite of ours.

Three Sisters, Union Theatre – Review

Credit: Everything Theatre

Pros: A voyeuristic Chekhov. Clear and easy to follow with no extraneous detail. Staged well with intricate use of sound. Some audience members loved it. Cons: It lacks the weight required by the text. Character is often diluted to serve the pace of the storytelling. A short jaunt through the rain from Southwark Tube, the new locale of the Union Theatre is a stone’s throw from its previous spot, albeit on the other side of the road. With its cosy bar, ...

Read More »

Dr. Angelus, Finborough Theatre – Review

Credit: Lidia Crisafulli

Pros: Wonderful acting from a talented cast. Cons: The script slows a little towards a slightly disappointing end. Do you trust your doctor? Perhaps not if they go by the name of Dr. Angelus. The protagonist of James Bridie’s play seems like a charismatic, if slightly eccentric, general practitioner. But this psychological thriller is a story of manipulation, where all is not quite as it seems. Set in Glasgow in 1920, the enigmatic Dr. Angelus has hired a new partner, ...

Read More »

This Might Be It, Theatre N16 – Review

Credit: Vantage Point Theatre

Pros: Imaginative use of space, props and movement. A show that will make you think. Cons: Some may find the themes difficult to engage with. A bit shallow in places. Nestled above the welcoming Bedford pub, a stone’s throw from Balham tube, lies Theatre N16. This was my first visit and I would welcome the chance to return. The auditorium is perhaps not for the claustrophobic or physically expansive, but I found it cosy and welcoming. Perhaps paradoxically the proximity ...

Read More »

The Woman in Black, Fortune Theatre – Review

Credit: Tristram Kenton

Pros: A perfect venue dripping with atmosphere and an eerie sense of expectation. Cons: Hysterically shrieking members of the audience breaking the tension. Plays in the West End are often short lived as they can rarely depend on customers returning to the same show.  The ultimate exception is of course Agatha Christie’s  Mousetrap, which has been running continuously in London since 1952.  A distant but creditable second is The Woman in Black, a mere stripling of only 25 years standing. ...

Read More »