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Comedy

No need for explanations here, but if you need a laugh then this is the category for you! You’ll find reviews of all the shows that have had us rolling in the aisles on this page.

Dummy, Bourbon Bar – Review

Dummy

Pros: Candid and resounding. Cons: This show deserves a bigger audience. Anders Lee’s background as a comedian comes across distinctly in Dummy, although this is not quite the show one might expect. The jokes are there, as well as some awkward private revelations and a little interaction with the room. Yet, in his new work, Lee is promoting a socio-political message that is strongly relevant in our evolved civilisation. Diagnosed with autistic spectrum disorder as a child, Lee is now a grown-up, ...

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Two-Man, One-Man, Greenside @ Infirmary Street (Olive Studio) – Review

Photo credit: Becca Lambright

Pros: The storyline is genius! Cons: Considering the quirky talents of the performers, the show could be enriched. The Edinburgh Festival Fringe programme is brimming with thousands of solo-shows, which are particularly suitable for their limited budget and less demanding venue requirements. Inspired by this phenomenon, USA comedy-duo, Patrick Romano and Benjamin Behrend devised Two-Man, One-Man- a goofy play about two performers and their one-man shows, who find themselves sharing the limelight, or to be more precise, taking turns in it. ...

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When the Friendship Has Sailed, C Venues: C Aquila, Edinburgh Festival Fringe – Review

When the Friendship Has Sailed

Pros: A versatile cast, clever props and a well-rounded piece that delivers lots of humour alongside the take-home message. The cast and crew should be proud. Cons: None. Loneliness is a hot topic that can leave you out in the cold. We’ve known for decades that it affects the elderly, but the media has only discussed loneliness in millennials and upwards in the last few years. Carrie, the protagonist of When the Friendship Has Sailed, has a goldfish to talk ...

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BLUE HEART @ C Venues, C Too Ed Fringe Review

Blue Heart- Ed Fringe- Review

Pro’s: Two exceptional Caryl Churchill scripts Con’s: Committed but inexperienced actors With thousands of shows competing to make an impact in the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, it’s a bold move for a student ensemble to dive into the fray, pitching their production up against veterans and professionals. The young players of the University of Greenwich’s Bathway Theatre Company deserve kudos for taking the plunge with a pair of challenging Caryl Churchill plays. They realise this project with no shortage of commitment ...

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Misanthrope, Camden’s People Theatre – Review

Misanthrope Fanny Dulin (Eliante) Photo Anais Le Pape

Pros: Very entertaining and well acted performance which reminds us how relevant Molière’s plays still are today. Cons: The political point that Furlong tries to make is forced and doesn’t fit the play. In his preface to Tartuffe, Jean Poquelin, better known as Molière, wrote that “if the purpose of comedy is to correct men’s vices, I do not see why any group of men should have special privileges. If this were so, it would have a far more dangerous social consequence ...

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Don’t Panic! It’s Challenge Anneka, The Bunker – Review

Credit Paul Aitchison

Pros: As a piece of theatre, this will entertain many. Cons: As a piece about anxiety, it seems at times almost to send up the subject matter. Cards on the table: I suffer from anxiety. It controls my whole life in ways most people will never realise, and what people see as unsociable is in fact me avoiding anything that could heighten my anxiety. Even reviewing can trigger it. I might seem confident and relaxed, but what people don’t see ...

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Tartuffe, Theatre Royal Haymarket – Review

Credit: Helen Maybanks

Pros: Good to see a foreign language production in the West End Cons: A failure of common sense in the use of surtitles Molière’s Tartuffe on the West End stage. A story of bad faith and credulity for the age of MAGA and taking back control, in a version that’s simultaneously accessible to English and French speakers. An admirable project, and one that might have made perfect sense on paper. The same is not true on stage. Christopher Hampton’s adaptation ...

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