Home » Author Archives: Steve Caplin

Author Archives: Steve Caplin

Red Palace, The Vaults – Review

The Vaults comprise a network of tunnels and performance spaces beneath Waterloo Station, and they’ve rarely been put to better use than in this immersive fantasy production. The dank, wet tunnels have been transformed into a medieval palace, a forest, boudoirs and cabaret spaces to powerful effect. Despite having visited the Vaults many times before, the space felt both new and exciting, with a real sense of mystery and discovery. The evening begins in the great hall, where you can ...

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Interview: Rosanna Mallinson on ImmerCity

ImmerCity stage site-specific immersive murder mysteries. The three shows to date have been set in The London Museum of Water and Steam, Kensington Library, and St Matthew’s Church in Bethnal Green. They all follow the same format: the audience plays in groups of six or seven, each person following one of the actors as they move through different spaces and interact with other members of the cast. In the interval, each audience group reconvenes to discuss and compare what they’ve ...

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Sherlock Holmes and The Invisible Thing, Rudolf Steiner Theatre – Review

The world isn’t short of new Sherlock Holmes stories. Several hundred have been written since Conan Doyle hung up his pen, and in the main they stick closely to the character of the original stories. So why is it that, when bringing Holmes to the stage, dramatists feel the need to give the famously asexual detective a love life? It started with the ill-fated Sherlock Holmes – The Musical, featuring a woefully miscast Ron Moody in platform heels (he was ...

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The Unholy Marriage of Slice and Sweetly – St Matthews Church – Review

ImmerCity’s lastest immersive murder mystery takes place in and around St Matthews Church in Bethnal Green. It’s 1955, and memories of the war still resonate. You’re present at the wedding of Jim Slice, son of East End gangster Micky, to Maud Sweetly, the daughter of feisty widow Cheryl. But Maud has failed to show up; and neither her twin sister, nor her cousin Bernie, can explain why. It’s left to the priest, Reverend Gris, to keep the two warring families ...

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Trump the Musical, King’s Head Theatre – Review

It’s the impossibly distant year 2020, and the world is on the brink of nuclear war. King Nigel Farage rules the Disunited Kingdom of England and Northern Ireland, and Trump’s popularity is higher than ever: “He gave us our jobs back,” exclaims one satisfied voter, “I’m now a full-time Muslim hunter.” Trump The Musical plays, as the central character tells us, to “the biggest musical theatre crowd there has ever been”. A riotous evening of song and dance, satire and ...

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Butterfly Power, Rosemary Branch Theatre – Review

“Cigarette, dear?”“No thank you, dear.”“I think I might have a cigarette, dear.”“No you won’t, dear.”“Very well, dear.” And so the scene is set: in two inflatable armchairs, presided over by a goldfish on a gold pedestal, sit Mr and Mrs Fox. She – in a luminous, captivating performance by Alice Marshall – is domineering, supercilious, wilfully mispronouncing words and oblivious to the feelings of those around her; he – a foppish, Wooster-like Jack J Fairley – is an ineffectual, waistcoated ...

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Bed Peace: The Battle of Yohn and Joko, Cockpit Theatre – Review

In 1969, at the height of the Vietnam War, John Lennon and Yoko Ono staged a week-long press conference from their bed in a hotel in Montreal. Set in the round, in the intimate space of the Cockpit Theatre, Bed Peace opens with the narrator, an exuberant and likeable Helen Foster, outlining the setting in rhyming couplets. It hurtles through some personal history, from Yoko’s miscarriage, through the couple’s wedding in Gibraltar, to their eventual bed-in in Montreal (although, curiously, ...

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