Home » Author Archives: Everything Theatre (page 107)

Author Archives: Everything Theatre

Spotlight: David Tennant

David Tennant as Hamlet, Courtesy of The Guardian David Tennant. Well, let’s just get this out of the way: yes, he played the tenth Doctor. And not only that, but he was also voted ‘the best Doctor’ by readers of Doctor Who Magazine, and (time)Lord knows they must know best! He was also one of the longest serving Doctors, ranking 2nd on TV and 3rd overall if we include the Doctor Who radio broadcasts. And let’s not forget that he himself ...

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Avignon Off Festival, France

www.avignonleoff.com While most UK readers will have heard of, and probably indeed attended the Edinburgh Fringe, I imagine that only few will know about the Avignon Off festival. The similarities between the two are striking: they were both founded in 1947, they both attract hundreds of companies and thousands of tourists, they each last for three weeks every summer and, ironically, they both tout themselves as the largest theatre festival in the world. Sometimes it seems like the organisers of ...

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Journey’s End, Duke of York’s Theatre

R.C. Sherriff  Directed by David Grindley ★★★★★ Courtesy of TimeOut Ordinarily, we reserve the elusive five stars for productions which have broken the boundaries in some way. Frankenstein was unlike anything I’d seen before, and One Man, Two Guvnors was the single funniest production I have ever had the pleasure of watching. David Grindley’s production of Sherriff’s Journey’s End doesn’t deliver anything ground-breaking – in many ways it doesn’t allow for much artistic license since it is in essence a ...

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A Woman Killed with Kindness, National Theatre

Thomas Heywood Directed by Katie Mitchell ★★ Courtesy of the National Theatre The National’s recent productions have been so good that I suppose it was only a matter of time before they produced one that didn’t live up to the high standards we now expect. Despite being classed as Heywood’s masterpiece, I cannot profess to having heard of A Woman Killed with Kindness before the National’s revival. Some basic research reveals that it is a critically acclaimed piece, regarded as ...

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Theatre Royal Haymarket, London

Theatre Royal Haymarket OUR OPINION  Before I wrote this, I knew very little about the Theatre Royal Haymarket, but I have always appreciated its luxurious interior, and it has provided me with some of the most memorable nights of theatre in my life (for instance, Waiting for Godot and Flare Path). Despite this, I had never really thought about its history. The research that I have done for this piece however has completely changed my perspective. So much so in ...

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Spotlight: Andrew Scott

Andrew Scott as Julian the Apostate Emperor and Galilean, Henrik Ibsen’s ‘lost masterpiece’, has just opened for the first time in English at London’s National Theatre. The three-hour-long epic Drama deals with the rise and subsequent fall of Emperor Julian the Apostate in the 4th Century AD. The play relies heavily on the actor playing the role of Julian to carry it through: indeed, a flat performance would make the entire experience totally unpalatable. But Andrew Scott, who plays this ...

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London Road, National Theatre

Book and Lyrics by Alecky Blythe Music and Lyrics by Adam CorkDirected by Rufus Norris★★★★ Courtesy of the National Theatre The National Theatre’s London Road is a musical about the (recent) murders of five prostitutes in Ipswich. On the face of it, it sounds like it should be hugely distasteful: a horrifying and entirely true story which is still fresh in the minds of the victims’ families, which has been trivialised and turned into popular entertainment. Rather strangely though, it ...

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Being Shakespeare, Trafalgar Studios

Jonathan Bate Directed by Tom Cairns ★★★ Courtesy of the Ambassador Theatre Group There is always a risk in going to see one man shows as the entire production rests on one person delivering an outstanding performance if the audience are to be kept engaged. Being Shakespeare is also a reasonably long one man show, running for 80 minutes over two acts. Fortunately, Simon Callow, one of Britain’s best loved actors, delivers a very engaging performance which makes it more ...

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Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead, Theatre Royal Haymarket

Tom StoppardDirected by Trevor Nunn★★★★ Courtesy of the Theatre Royal Haymarket In truth, we hadn’t planned to see Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead so early in its London run: we were actually planning on trying to catch the last performance of Blythe Spirit at the Apollo. However, due to circumstances beyond our control, we weren’t able to do so. Thankfully, quick thinking allowed us to snap up some front row seats to Tom Stoppard’s existentialist masterpiece, which turned out to ...

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Betrayal, Comedy Theatre

Harold Pinter Directed by Ian Rickson ★★★ Courtesy of Sonia Friedman Productions Rather controversially, I am always unsure about the works of Harold Pinter. On the one hand, I recognise that his writing is certainly very clever: economical and extremely human dialogue, emotionally reserved characters and the ability to develop the story and the characters without the use of longer monologues. On the other hand, I have always found his work a little hard to engage with on stage. Despite ...

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