Home » Reviews » Comedy » Two-Man, One-Man, Greenside @ Infirmary Street (Olive Studio) – Review
Photo credit: Becca Lambright
Photo credit: Becca Lambright

Two-Man, One-Man, Greenside @ Infirmary Street (Olive Studio) – Review

Pros: The storyline is genius!

Cons: Considering the quirky talents of the performers, the show could be enriched.

Pros: The storyline is genius! Cons: Considering the quirky talents of the performers, the show could be enriched. The Edinburgh Festival Fringe programme is brimming with thousands of solo-shows, which are particularly suitable for their limited budget and less demanding venue requirements. Inspired by this phenomenon, USA comedy-duo, Patrick Romano and Benjamin Behrend devised Two-Man, One-Man- a goofy play about two performers and their one-man shows, who find themselves sharing the limelight, or to be more precise, taking turns in it. Troubled soul Arnold (Patrick Romano) is standing dramatically centre stage, dressed in all black. He's reminiscing about his disappointing…

Summary

Rating

Good

A three-man show about two one-man shows that compete on the same stage. A treat.

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The Edinburgh Festival Fringe programme is brimming with thousands of solo-shows, which are particularly suitable for their limited budget and less demanding venue requirements. Inspired by this phenomenon, USA comedy-duo, Patrick Romano and Benjamin Behrend devised Two-Man, One-Man- a goofy play about two performers and their one-man shows, who find themselves sharing the limelight, or to be more precise, taking turns in it.

Troubled soul Arnold (Patrick Romano) is standing dramatically centre stage, dressed in all black. He’s reminiscing about his disappointing childhood and the sense of inappropriateness that, from a young age, prevented him from mingling with his peers. Suddenly, the door of the auditorium slams open and a clumsy boy wearing shorts and a Hawaiian shirt walks in, apologising to the audience for his lateness. His name is Miles (Benjamin Behrend) and he’s a stand-up comedian.

When the stage manager (Joe Miciak) realises that the space has been accidentally double-booked, he suggests that the two alternate on stage for a ten-minute slot. Finally striking a deal, Arnold carries on with his existentialistic digression, whilst Miles seems to be following to the letter the unwritten manual of stand-up, with prop comedy, observational commentary, unnecessary swearing, as well as audience participation.

Mocking millennial culture and privileged artists, this theatrical oddity features improv, spoken word, music and physicality. Although with different artistic skills, Romano and Behrend are both accomplished performers whose talents could have shone even brighter if some of the sketches had been removed  of the excessive faffing. Miciak’s off stage commentary is priceless and adds a cherry on the top of a quirky and well-conceived farce.

Co-Written, Directed and Produced by: Patrick Romano and Benjamin Behrend
Booking Information: This show has now completed its run.

About Marianna Meloni

Marianna Meloni
Marianna, being Italian, has an opinion on just about everything and believes that anything deserves an honest review. Her dream has always been to become an arts critic and, after collecting a few degrees, she realised that it was easier to start writing in a foreign language than finding a job in her home country. In the UK, she tried the route of grown-up employment but soon understood that the arts and live events are highly addictive.