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(i feel fine), New Diorama Theatre – Review

Pros: An intriguing twist on the traditional romantic comedy with an excellent
cast.

Cons: It’s rather heavy on the angst.

Pros: An intriguing twist on the traditional romantic comedy with an excellent cast. Cons: It’s rather heavy on the angst. Tim and Daisy meet in a pub. They have a few drinks. They have dinner. They go back to Daisy’s place. Tim really wants to see Daisy again, but she’s not interested in a serious commitment. Based on this description you’d be forgiven for thinking that Fat Git Theatre’s (i feel fine) is nothing more than the latest bit of harmless rom‐com fluff. And how wrong you would be. Because the world Daisy and Tim live in is about…

Summary

rating

Excellent!

A funny, slightly absurd combination of rom‐com, apocalyptic drama and self‐reflection.

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Tim and Daisy meet in a pub. They have a few drinks. They have dinner. They go back to Daisy’s place. Tim really wants to see Daisy again, but she’s not interested in a serious commitment. Based on this description you’d be forgiven for thinking that Fat Git Theatre’s (i feel fine) is nothing more than the latest bit of harmless rom‐com fluff. And how wrong you would be. Because the world Daisy and Tim live in is about to end, and there’s absolutely nothing harmless or fluffy about that.

Sophie Steer (Daisy) and Ed Davis (Tim) bring Joe White’s script to life with sparkle, compassion and a lot of enjoyable awkwardness. Their characters are relatable, easy to like and easy to forgive when they’re being a bit unpleasant to each other (because, let’s be honest, you’d probably be grumpy as well if you knew everything was about to end any day now). That feeling that Daisy and Tim are just like us is the strength of this show, because it makes you consider what you’d do in their position. Would you be like Tim, happy in denial, going to work as if everything is fine, or would you be more of a realistic‐but‐depressed Daisy, hidingout in your flat? Or maybe you’d prefer the third option, presented by the unnamed man (Shubham Saraf) who’s camping out in the woods, away from civilisation.

Another excellent feature of this production is the set, which consists of a few simple yet evocative elements: a tent, an old, overgrown TV, neatly stacked tins of beans. It gives an absurd, quirky edge to the show that lightens the mood a bit. And that’s very welcome; this play might be funny, but that doesn’t mean it isn’t heavy stuff. As the characters contemplate how to cope with their lack of a future, or if coming up with a strategy is even worth it at all, there’s a distinct sense that maybe White is enjoying their angsting a bit too much. There are no ‘Tom Hanks in Cast Away overcoming depression by talking to a volleyball named Wilson’ moments. Overall then, this is not an uplifting production. But it is an intriguing, thought‐provoking offer for theatregoers who don’t mind a bit of post‐show self‐reflection. Perhaps accompanied by a drink. You know, in case it all ends tomorrow.

Author: Joe White
Director: Josh Roche
Producer: Fat Git Theatre
Booking Information: This show has now completed its run.

About Eva de Valk

Eva de Valk
Eva moved to London to study the relationship between performance and the city. She likes most kinds of theatre, especially when it involves 1) animals, 2) audience participation and/or 3) a revolving stage. Seventies Andrew Lloyd Webber holds a special place in her heart, which she makes up for by being able to talk pretentiously about Shakespeare. When she grows up she wants to be either a Jedi or Mark Gatiss.